How’s your brand visibility? SEO and Google, post-Penguin.

Posted on May 28, 2013 | No comments (yet!)

How’s your brand visibility on Google? Did it recently change? Just the other day, Google implemented their newest rule changes, codenamed Penguin, and the brand visibility of some sites plummeted. (That bass drum you hear is the Salvation Army, sinking). Some sites moved up. Our site, BTW, continues to do fine on searches. The people […]

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Must you compete on price?

Posted on Jan 2, 2013 | No comments (yet!)

Competing on price is evidence of branding failure. The strongest brands don’t have to compete on price. Consumers happily pay 40% more for Morton Salt over store-brand sodium chloride. They’ll pay an equivalent premium for a famous deodorant over a chemically-identical price brand. Is it just awareness? No. Some brands have high visibility, but that’s […]

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Selection Set: get in it, and win it

Posted on Jul 9, 2012 | No comments (yet!)

What’s the first duty of a brand? You could make a good argument for a clear vision. Or internal sign-on. Visibility. Differentiation. Customer insight. All of those would be reasonable choices, because they’re all fundamental, and must be present to have any hope of success. So … let’s go into Double Jeopardy where the scores […]

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Is your website a destination or a conduit?

Posted on Jan 16, 2012 | No comments (yet!)

Hulu and Netflix are both investing hundreds of millions of dollars into original programming, instead of being just a conduit for content. The value of mere distribution is shrinking everywhere – it’s not a great time to be a wholesaler. Relevant question for your brand: can search engine robots find original content on your website? […]

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How many competitors do you have, really?

Posted on Nov 17, 2011 | No comments (yet!)

If you answered, “too many” or “way too many” or “crikey, too bloody many,” you are normal, worriedly normal, or weirdly influenced by Danger Mouse but normal. Most companies (and cpg brands, job applicants, charities, tv shows, candidates, etc., etc.) feel they have plenty of competition. They’re correct. One traditional (and often correct) strategy is […]

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Keep your “drill down” down

Posted on Jun 21, 2011 | No comments (yet!)

Writing for and designing websites means serving three audiences, all of them important: people who want to hear your brand story (Quals), people who also want to know your proofs and processes (Quants), and search engine robots (Bots). Most websites fail this test. The biggest failure is not realizing that 86% of visitors, the Quals, […]

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Leave company and product naming up to us.

Posted on May 24, 2011 | No comments (yet!)

Not that you aren’t passionately concerned with your new name. On the contrary. You’re the one most in the risk/reward hot seat. But naming is not your primary business, so it’s something you should outsource, just as you outsource brain surgery, elevator repair, and dog grooming. There are people out there with skills, experience and […]

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Giant Accounting Firm Joined Witness Protection Program

Posted on May 15, 2011 | 9 comments

One day in 2011, my wife was watching golf’s Players Championship on tv, and asked me about the logo of a principal sponsor: “Who is pwc?” I had a guess in mind, but I had to go to Wikipedia to verify it, which should tell you something. It seems one of the world’s largest accounting […]

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What can your brand learn from the Donald Trump brand?

Posted on Apr 30, 2011 | No comments (yet!)

The Donald shot to the top of the Republican contenders for the 2012 Presidential election in a few short weeks. Clearly some shrewd marketing was in play. Lesson One: In a weak competitive field, be aggressive. The competitors (some announced, some coyly un-announced to preserve their Rupert Murdoch paychecks) were struggling to get out of […]

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The Rule of 3

Posted on Dec 2, 2010 | No comments (yet!)

If you’re #1 in your category, never mention #2. If you’re #2, get more visible than #1. If you’re #3 in your category, change categories.

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